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Tuesday, November 15, 2005
FictionNewsPodcasts

Raincoast Books is now offering a literary podcast for some of our top print titles. The inaugural podcast features Jim Lynch’s novel The Highest Tide (published by Bloomsbury USA and distributed in Canada by Raincoast). The podcast includes original interviews and readings by author Jim Lynch, recorded when he attended the 2005 Vancouver International Writers and Readers Festival.

Jim Lynch’s debut novel, The Highest Tide, is about one transformative summer for 13-year-old, speed-reading, insomniac Miles O’Malley. Miles is obsessed with Rachel Carson and with the sea. One night while exploring the mudflats of Puget Sound he becomes the first person to see a live giant squid. The discovery sets in motion a media frenzy and a bizarre chain of events related to further marine discoveries. In Lynch’s words, “What I was hoping to do was give a rendition of reality that felt like science fiction ... all I was essentially doing was describing things in as precise a detail as I could ... I did the research so I could do things like describe a moon snail and how it prowls along the flats and how its shell rides up high on its big fleshy body like a bulldozer.”

The recordings for Raincoast’s inaugural podcast were captured by Robert Ouimet of At Large Media, Ltd., who produced the podcast for Raincoast Books. Future podcasts will include interviews with bestselling authors and new talents, excerpts from Raincoast published and distributed titles, and other special features.

For more information on The Highest Tide visit www.raincoast.com/highest-tide/

The Raincoast podcast is available from iTunes by searching for “Raincoast” or the RSS feed is available from Feedburner:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/raincoast

The MP3 file can also be downloaded by clicking on the below link:
Full Podcast: Listen to Jim Lynch

Or listen to this shorter audio excerpt
Sample reading by Jim Lynch



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